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www.jerichocentre.org.uk
Community site for the Jericho district of Oxford, UK
Thu, April 24, 2014

Max Moonlight’s

Music academy

Tuition in Guitar, Bass guitar, Ukelele, Pedal Steel, Recording, Accompaniment.

More...

Free football sessions

Jericho Street Sport Site. Saturdays 12.45pm – 2.45pm
Appropriate footwear required. Age Range: 13years plus
For further information contact 07788 244 890

Looking for company

I am looking for a friendly lady who would like to spend a couple of hours a week, or fortnight, being company for another nice lady who likes going out to cafés, visits to local museums, or a bit of window shopping, but who doesn’t enjoy it much alone. If you think you could offer this, please contact Bee on 07786 277971

ABOUT JERICHO - HISTORY ITEM

A brief history of Jericho

The Jericho Tavern from whcih this district may have derived its name

Item posted: January 07 2013

The origins of the name Jericho remain clouded in the mists of time.

In the Bible, Jericho signifies a ‘remote place’ and could have referred to the area’s location just outside the Oxford city walls. In the 17th Century, people coming to Oxford from the north after the city gates were shut could take refuge in ‘The Jericho House’. This inn, which was subsequently rebuilt in its three-storey form in 1818, is now called ‘The Jericho Tavern’.

Most of Jericho’s first round of housing development took place in the 19th Century as a means of accomodating workers in expanding local businesses. Their numbers increased after the construction of the Oxford Canal (1790), the building of the Jericho Iron and Brass Foundry, now Lucy’s (1825), and the arrival of Oxford University Press (1826).

Their houses were small and basic, lacking even basic drainage. As a result most of Jericho was little more than a squalid slum and vulnerable to outbreaks of cholera. The worst area was a block of small houses behind the Jericho House in an area called ‘Jericho Gardens’. These tenements were demolished in 1937 and the land they stood on is now occupied by the school.

Initially, building was only possible on the higher land closer to Walton Street. It was only after the 1860s, as the land closer to the canal was steadily drained, that the area below Albert Street was developed. This included the building on Canal Street of St. Barnabas Church (1870)— whose arrival provided some moral uplift and started to dispel the area’s sordid reputation. A lot of the housing was, and remains, two-up, two-down terraced housing, built by speculators or by landlords such as St. John’s College or Lucy’s.

Jericho faced a major crisis in the 1960s with proposals to demolish most of the fairly dilapidated houses and turn the area over to offices and light industry. This was resisted vigorously by the Residents’ Association, with the support of the Church and local councillors, particularly the late Olive Gibbs.

While some of the housing by then was too far gone and had to be destroyed, most of the area was saved and renovated. As result of its convenient location close to the city centre, Jericho has now become a desirable area for young professional people, though it also retains many residents who have spent all their lives here.

Did you know ...

How many people live in Jericho?

In 2011 Jericho had a population of 1,400 residents living in households.  There are no communal establishment residents. There has been little change in the total number of residents since 2001.

Margaret Thatcher used to live here?

In her Oxford days, she lived at 12 Richmond Road. It is alleged she shared the house with two red-hot communists who lived on a diet of sausages. This may account for her later views on socialists and known dislike of sausages.

Why Juxon Street?

Juxon Street is named after William Juxon, President of St John’s College from 1621-33.

 

Other recent postings

Jericho census profile

Happy days at the Scala

The Dead of Jericho

Frances Wright

Ted Harris

Cyril Pead

Street Fair Stalls

Would you like to book a stall for the Street Fair on June 14?

£50 per full stall (£20 for half stall if you are a charity or resident of Jericho).

Please click HERE.