1 King Street



Originally the building was a grain store for the miller who lived opposite. The original chutes are still there but are buried beneath the road. The building became a warehouse - mainly for broken pianos. The people who lived in the Victorian houses where Grantham House now stands used to collect pieces of piano to burn in their open fires. At the end of the 1980s the building was converted to a house.
More...
23 Albert Street



Dating from 1840, this used to be part of the Hall’s pub, the Bakers Arms. In 1991 the pub was closed and converted it into two dwellings. Number 23 comprises what were the toilets, the beer cellar, and a garage. To keep the beer cool, there were originally no windows on the ground floor.
More...
24 Great Clarendon Street



This could be one of the oldest buildings in Jericho. Its two large and distinctive windows and the door on the corner point to its origins as a shop - latterly Bob's cycle shop. In 1979, it was converted into a house.
27 Cranham Street



Originally constructed in the 1880s as a Wesleyan chapel this building has served many purposes, including a garage for a removals business, hence the large opening, More recently it was a laboratory for Green College but is likely to be sold for housing.
More...
35 Albert Street



This house was built in 1840 as a school for Wesleyan boys, and was connected with a nearby chapel in Cranham Street. The school closed in the 1850s was then taken over by a coal merchant who kept his horses in the lower part and his stock in the upper part. The building still has the hook used to hoist the bags up and down.
More...
Baptist Chapel



Albert Street Baptist chapel was built in 1881. The chapel is in regular use and its members also participate actively in community activities,
More...
Blavatnik School of Government



Oxford's most dramatic new building. Opened in 2015. The lower ground floor has two lecture theatres above which there are four levels which embrace a large central atrium. This is one of the city's most environmentally friendly buildings. Geothermal boreholes will provide heating and cooling through ground-source heat pumps, and the toilets are flushed with rainwater.
More...
Canal Street



This street was not finally built up until the 1870s because the construction of the canal had blocked drainage and led to persistent flooding. During the urban renewal of the 1970s, many properties were demolished and a number of small waterside industries were relocated. At the north end. for example, a former builders' yard became the site of the Whitworth Place flats.
More...
Freuds



This was build in 1835 as St.Paul’s Church. In 1963 St.Paul and St.Barnabas parishes united and in 1969 St.Paul’s was closed. It went through a number of owners until 1988 when it became Freud’s Arts Cafe.
More...
Jericho Community Centre



This was built at the end of the 19th century as the St. Barnabas Church Institute, and the Church still owns it. Since the early 1980s, however, it has been used as a community centre and is the focus of many activities—from a community cafe to children's playgroups, to youth groups, to dancing classes.
More...
Jericho Health Centre



The Jericho Health Centre occupies the ground floor of New Radcliffe House in Walton Street. The building cost £11 million and was completed in 2012. It is owned by Oxford University which leases the premises to the NHS for two GP practices which have around a dozen doctors.
More...
Jericho Street



Jericho Street existed before the district was built up and for a long time had an open sewer running down the middle. Houses along the eastern section were originally owned by St. John’s College but the 1970s the City Council developed the site for sheltered housing.
More...
Jericho Tavern



The three-storey building was erected in 1818 on the site of the original Jericho House. The Jericho Tavern is a regular music venue, and notably the birthplace of bands such as Radiohead and Supergrass.
More...
Jericho Wharf



This is the location for a remarkable community initiative. This new development will include a boatyard, a new community centre, and a vibrant public square.
More...
Juxon Street



Built up from the 1870s by St John's College this street was named after a former college President. Juxon Street was considered superior to the rest of Jericho and offered small villa-style properties for middle-class families. Most of the houses, were subsequently bought by what is now the Lucys property company.
More...
Mutton Yard



Originally this courtyard was part of a slaughterhouse and still has the original cobblestones. It was bought by Ron Mutton of A1 Plumbing who converted into an office and three houses.
More...
Nelson Street



Named after Lord Nelson pub -- later the Carpenters Arms which is now housing. The first building plots were put up for sale in 1840 and the first houses built with rubble from the buildings demolished to clear the site for the Martyrs’ Memorial in St Giles.
More...
Oxford Canal



Jericho's history and character have been shaped by its canalside location. It was completed in 1790 as a means of bringing bringing coal, raw materials and manufactured goods from the West Midlands. Now it is primarily used for leisure, as well as a site for floating affordable housing. It also offers an attractive walking and cycling route into the city.
More...
Oxford Synagogue



There has been a synagogue on this site since 1893, but there was a dramatic redevelopment in 2004. Oxford Synagogue is distinctive in that it brings together all denominations of Judaism.
More...
Oxford University Press



Jericho's largest and most distinguished business. Completed in 1827, this originally housed the printing press but not the publishing business. Now the the position is reversed, and this building only has the publishing offices.
More...
Phoenix cinema



Oxford’s oldest surviving cinema. Movies have been shown on this site since 1913 after the opening of the ‘North Oxford Kinema’. The front of the building was extensively remodeled in 1998.
More...
Richmond Road



Originally called Worcester Terrace, at the top two-up-and-two-down chequered brick ‘working-class’ houses, built around 1830. Further down, and on the opposite side of the street, there are three terraces of architect-designed ‘artisans’ cottages’, built around the mid-1860s. In the mid-1870s another 20 large houses were added - ‘semi-detached ‘ Victorian Gothic’.
More...
School Court



This Grade II listed building was once St Barnabas School. When the school moved to its new site the building was sold to the Council to rehouse Jericho residents who lost their houses during the 1970s urban renewal.
More...
St Barnabas Church



Built in the late 1860s, the campanile of St. Barnabas church, rising high above Jericho, is one of Oxford's most conspicuous landmarks. The design is based on the cathedral of Torcello near Venice.
More...
St Barnabas School



The original school was in Great Clarendon Street. The new building dates from 1977 but has since been extended and improved several times, most recently with the installation of solar panels.
St Sepulchre’s cemetery



This quiet sanctuary dates from 1850, when it was opened partly in response to a series of cholera epidemics. The grounds are now cared for by a group of local volunteers, the Friends of St Sepulchre's.
More...
Walton Lane



Walton Lane was laid out as a service road behind the terraced houses facing Walton Street. It provided rear access to the houses for servants and tradesmen. The coach houses were later converted into garages and the old workshops are now private houses.
More...
Walton Street



Named after ancient manor of Walton whose manor house was roughly on the site of what is now St Sepulchres. Was built up from the 1820s on the western side and was completed on both sides by the 1870s. Subsequently many of the houses were converted to shops.
More...
Wellington Street



In the 1820s, the eastern end was known as New College Lane and had an open sewer. The western end was build from the 1860s and here the houses were built higher because of the risk of flooding, hence the steps to the front doors. In 1966 part of the south side was cleared to make way for an extension of OUP.
More...
Worcester College



Although Worcester College was not founded until 1714, its site dates from the early Middle Ages when its grounds included the eastern channel of the Castle Mill Stream. The present lake within the college grounds is all that remains of this channel. The first occupants, from 1265, were Carmelite friars.
More...